What’s in a Name – Washington County

What's in a Name - Washington County

It’s no surprise who Washington County is named after. It’s named for Revolutionary War General and our first president, George Washington. Formed in 1781, the county is one of the earliest of numerous places named for the father of our country. Its county seat is also called Washington, but locals also know that the place is often referred to as “little Washington.” Below are some

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The Siege of Fort Pitt

The Siege of Fort Pitt

Land has always been valuable and the source of much conflict amongst people, and the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers made this area, and what would later become Pittsburgh, choice real estate and the site of much violence. Initially in the 1740s, when English trader, William Trent, first came to the area and set up a trading post at the headwaters of the

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What’s in a Name – Lawrence County

What's in a Name - Lawrence County

Lawrence County lies to the north and west of Allegheny County, skirting the Ohio state line. The county owes its name to naval ships and officers. The county derives its name from the USS Lawrence, the flagship of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, who sailed on this ship during the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. The ship was disabled in that battle

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What’s in a Name? – Greene County

What's in a Name? - Greene County

If the counties in Pennsylvania were puzzle pieces, Greene County would be the corner piece that fits into the Southwest right angle of Pennsylvania, bordering West Virginia on the south and Ohio to the east. Greene County was founded in 1796 and named for Revolutionary War General Nathanael Greene. Nearly 90% rural, it’s one of the most sparsely populated counties in the state with approximately

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The Underground Railroad in Pittsburgh

The Underground Railroad in Pittsburgh

Pennsylvania has played a pivotal role in current events in the United States throughout history. The Commonwealth made vital contributions to America’s independence from Great Britain in the 1700’s and continues to be an important part of history in the 21st century. Most recently, was the 2020 Presidential Election in which PA was a decisive battleground state. In the 19th century, when slavery was still

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Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement in Pittsburgh

Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement in Pittsburgh

On November 22, 1966, during the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Pittsburgh to deliver a speech at The University of Pittsburgh Student Union. His speech concluded with the words, “I still believe in the future. Our goal is freedom, and we’ll get there because the goal of America is freedom. Abused and scorned as we may be, our destiny is

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Therese Rocco – A Memoir: Book Review

Therese Rocco - A Memoir: Book Review

The book Therese Rocco- A Memoir is a great read for anyone interested in learning about how Pittsburgh has changed and, in some cases, stayed the same in the years between Therese Rocco getting a job with the City of Pittsburgh in 1948 and retiring as Assistant Police Chief in the mid-90s. In addition, we get a glimpse at her life both before her days

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Timeline of Pittsburgh

Timeline of Pittsburgh

Many historic, tragic, triumphant, and innovative events have occurred in Pittsburgh. It’s no surprise as our history goes back nearly 300 years. Pittsburgh began as a French fort but progressed over the years to be the first leader in coal and today as a front runner in technology and the health care industry. To give you a broader overview of how the city has grown

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What’s in a Name? – Somerset County

What's in a Name? - Somerset County

Somerset County was thrust into national prominence during the terrorist attacks of 9/11, but do you know how the county and many of the communities there got their names? Some are obvious, having derived from descriptions of geographical or features found in that area. But what about those other places? Some were named after people. Who were they? And why did they merit having a

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Christmas at Fort Pitt

Christmas at Fort Pitt

Pittsburgh’s First Christmas If those who first settled the city and lived at Fort Pitt in the 1750s got in a time machine and came forward to the future at Christmas, they’d be shocked at all the merriment and decorations. In 1758, Pittsburgh’s first Christmas was a particularly bleak one. Just one month earlier, the French had abandoned Fort Duquesne, burning it to the ground,

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