How Some Pittsburgh Neighborhoods Got Named

How Some Pittsburgh Neighborhoods Got Named

Allegheny Center, East & West All of these neighborhoods on Pittsburgh’s North Side take their names from Allegheny City, the independent municipality that was annexed by the city of Pittsburgh in 1907. Allentown This southern neighborhood of the city was named for Joseph Allen, an Englishman who purchased the land there in 1827. It became part of Pittsburgh in 1872. Arlington, Arlington Heights No one

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CCAC Adapts to Changing Times

CCAC Adapts to Changing Times

“Characteristically, community colleges have had the adaptability and flexibility to respond to their regions’ needs,” said Dr. Quinton B. Bullock, President, Community College of Allegheny County, who has been at the helm of CCAC since 2014. “We have embraced a partnership with business and industry to identify and develop programs to train our students for the future workforce. I have charged our Vice President of

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What’s in a Name? – Cambria County

What's in a Name? - Cambria County

“Cambria” is the Latinized term for the what the people of ancient Wales called their country Cymru. Cambria County shares that name perhaps because, like Wales, it has abundant coal. There are many other towns and communities in the county with interesting names. Here is a sampling: Carrolltown This community was named in honor of the United States’ first Roman Catholic Bishop, John Carroll, who

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The History of Community College of Allegheny County

The History of Community College of Allegheny County

In 1963, Pennsylvania passed the Community College Act, enabling regions throughout the state to create institutes of higher education. It came in response to the increasing number of high school graduates who wanted to continue their education. CCAC Opens With Two Campuses As a result, Community College of Allegheny County opened in 1966 with two locations: Boyce Campus in Monroeville and Allegheny Campus on the

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What’s in a Name? – Westmoreland County

What’s in a Name? - Westmoreland County

We live, work, worship, and play here, but do we know how some of the towns, boroughs, and municipalities around us acquired their names? Some are obvious, having derived from descriptions of geographical or features found in that area. But what about those other places? How did they get their names? Some were named after people. Who were they? And why did they merit having

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Robert Morris

Robert Morris

If George Washington had had his way, today, you may be seeing Morris on Broadway rather than the musical Hamilton. Robert Morris was known as the “Financier of the American Revolution” and was such a financial wizard that after the war, President George Washington offered him the position of Secretary of the Treasury in his cabinet. Morris declined the position and urged Washington to select Alexander Hamilton instead.

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What’s in a Name? – Allegheny County

What’s in a Name? – Allegheny County

We live, work, worship, and play here, but do we know how some of the towns, boroughs, and municipalities around us acquired their names? Some are obvious, having derived from descriptions of geographical or features found in that area. For instance, Oakland is reported to have gotten that name because of the numerous oak trees found there. The North Shore received that appellation because it

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William Pitt the Elder: Pittsburgh’s Well-Respected Namesake

William Pitt the Elder: Pittsburgh’s Well-Respected Namesake

Had King George III of Britain listened to William Pitt, those living in Pittsburgh today might be sipping tea and watching cricket instead of drinking Iron City beer and watching Steelers football. The city of Pittsburgh was named for the noted politician and statesman, William Pitt the Elder (not to be confused with his son, William Pitt the Younger) who often defended the rights of

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Pittsburgh Flu Epidemic of 1918

Pittsburgh Flu Epidemic of 1918

The opioid epidemic has claimed too many lives in our area, but at least in those cases, we know what’s causing the deaths and how to prevent them. Can you imagine thousands of people falling ill and dying and not knowing what was causing it, how to treat it, or how to prevent it? That is exactly what happened in Pittsburgh in the fall of

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100th Year of The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village

100th Year of The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village

Pittsburgh is rich in history. From the ancient oaks that line the streets of its old steel mill towns to the Revolutionary War landmarks; there is much for Pittsburghers to take pride in. This past week, one of Pittsburgh’s smaller-scale historic attractions reopened for its 100th season at the Carnegie Science Center. The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village reopened on November 21st with

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