The History Behind the Holiday: Cinco de Mayo

The History Behind the Holiday: Cinco de Mayo

The mention of Cinco de Mayo brings to mind bright colors, refreshing alcoholic drinks, and of course a celebration of the Mexican people. However, while America loves any reason to celebrate, the true meaning and purpose of celebrating the “Fifth of May” is often lost beneath fluttering pinatas and the glitters of alcohol-fueled parties. But fear not, because of Popular Pittsburgh’s never-ending thirst for knowledge,

Read the Full Article

Pittsburgh’s Amusement Park History

Pittsburgh is an ever-changing city. Many places of historical interest have been replaced with something more modern and arguably better. This was the fate for many of the amusement parks that were once scattered around the Greater Pittsburgh area. Modern day amusement parks got much of their start from trolley parks dating back to the late 1800’s. Trolley parks were created to give streetcar riders

Read the Full Article

Passover: The Story Behind the Customs

Passover: The Story Behind the Customs

For the roughly 15 million Jewish people across the globe, celebrating Passover is an extraordinarily important part of their faith. However, for all of its significance, a large portion of people (Jews included) are left in the dark when it comes to why it is celebrated and the reason behind the various customs attributed with it. With that in mind, as the Spring season brings

Read the Full Article

Easter Traditions: Why Do We Do Things We Do?

Easter Traditions: Why Do We Do Things We Do?

I was sitting in the sauna with a few other women, one of whom was Chinese. She asked one of the others there if they had a nice Easter? The woman replied that she did. Then the woman from China posed a question that stumped all of us sweating in the sauna. Why do people eat ham on Easter? No one could offer a reason,

Read the Full Article

The Bayernhof Museum

The Bayernhof Museum

It’s fun to fantasize about what kind of home you would build if money were no object. Charles B. Brown III didn’t have to fantasize about it; he did it. Brown built one of the area’s most unusual homes, The Bayernhof, which has since been turned into The Bayernhof Museum. Brown grew up in Aspinwall and graduated from Thiel College. After working in a machine

Read the Full Article

Henry Hornbostel: Pittsburgh’s Most Flamboyant Architect

Henry Hornbostel: Pittsburgh’s Most Flamboyant Architect

While some may argue that Frank Lloyd Wright is the architect most associated with Pittsburgh because of his design of the celebrated Fallingwater and others may cite Daniel Burnham because of the numerous buildings he designed for Pittsburgh, none would argue that Henry Hornbostel was the architect who not only created masterpieces in Pittsburgh but did it with unsurpassed style. Hornbostel was born in 1867

Read the Full Article

Pittsburgh’s Soldiers & Sailors Hall Preserving Military History

Pittsburgh’s Soldiers & Sailors Hall Preserving Military History

In his farewell address to Congress on April 19, 1951, legendary soldier General Douglas MacArthur said that, “Old soldiers never die; they just fade away.” No disrespect to the general, but Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood was founded to ensure that our soldiers and sailors and their selfless service never fade from our memories. During the Reconstruction and healing of the

Read the Full Article

Andy Warhol: A Pittsburgher at the Core

Andy Warhol: A Pittsburgher at the Core

Andy Warhol was an artist, a celebrity, a cultural icon, an eccentric, and, at heart, a Pittsburgher. While most people associate Warhol with the jet set and locations like New York City and Hollywood, most fail to realize how much of a Pittsburgher he was. Andy Warhola (he began to drop the “a” from his last name while in college) was born on August 6,

Read the Full Article

Henry Clay Frick and His Mark on Pittsburgh

Henry Clay Frick and His Mark on Pittsburgh

The Frick Building, Frick Park, Frick Fine Arts Building, the Frick Environmental Center: industrialist Henry Clay Frick certainly left his mark on Pittsburgh, but some may consider that mark to be more of a black eye. Frick is probably the most controversial businessman ever to operate in Pittsburgh. Even he acknowledged his unscrupulous nature, when former partner and then enemy, Andrew Carnegie, on his deathbed,

Read the Full Article

George Romero: The Man Who Made Zombies Cool

George Romero: The Man Who Made Zombies Cool

There were zombie movies before George Romero made the 1968 cult classic Night of the Living Dead, but none of them had the impact that this independent horror film had. A low-budget flick with a price tag of $114,000, Night of the Living Dead premiered to a less than stellar reception. Vince Canby, The New York Times movie reviewer, described his experience when seeing the

Read the Full Article