The Children’s Institute — A Long History of Helping Amazing Kids and Families

The Children’s Institute — A Long History of Helping Amazing Kids and Families

Since its founding in 1902, The Children’s Institute of Pittsburgh has identified needs in our community and has taken action to address those needs. The organization’s incredible history starts with Emile Terrenoire, who was only three years old in 1902 when he lost both his legs in a train accident. After his release from Pittsburgh’s Children’s Hospital, his widowed mother was unable to care for

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A Journey into Pittsburgh’s Early Years

A Journey into Pittsburgh's Early Years

Pittsburgh is a city that is proud of its heritage. Monuments and buildings are dedicated to its steelworkers, bridges are named after its artists, military, and sports heroes alike. The history is rich and its pride strong. But before the tall buildings overtook the skyline around The Point, or George Washington nearly died attempting to cross the Allegheny River near Washington Crossing Bridge – known

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What’s in a Name? – Fayette County

What's in a Name? - Fayette County

Fayette County was named for the Marquis de Lafayette, the French aristocrat who fought for independence along with the Americans in the Revolutionary War. The southern border of the county abuts the Mason-Dixon Line, the demarcation that separates Pennsylvania from West Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. Fayette’s county seat is Uniontown. Below are some of the communities in Fayette County and how they were named. Belle

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Mayors of Pittsburgh

Mayors of Pittsburgh

The records for leaders in Pittsburgh go back to the year 1794 with George Robinson as the first of eight Chief Burgesses of Pittsburgh. Then, in 1816, Pittsburgh incorporated as a city and the first mayor was appointed by the city council. Here’s a brief bio of each Pittsburgh mayor, from present day to 1816. + Open All Ed Gainey (2022-present), Democrat On January 3,

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The Rotunda

The Rotunda

The Rotunda at The Pennsylvanian on downtown Pittsburgh’s Liberty Avenue is so magnificent. It’s difficult to imagine that such a beautiful landmark was nearly demolished. A Beautiful Gateway Pittsburgh was the original “Gateway to the West” long before St. Louis claimed the title. Our rivers made us the embarkation point for those heading to the unsettled land west of the area. With the advent of

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The Steel Curtain

The Steel Curtain

If you grew up in Pittsburgh during the 1960s and early 70s, you probably watched Paul Shannon’s Adventure Time and remember him introducing cartoons by taking his “magic sword” and saying the phrase, “Down goes the curtain and back up again for Beanie and Cecil” or some other cartoon. However, there is another famous curtain in Pittsburgh, and when it went down, it stayed down

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How Some Pittsburgh Neighborhoods Got Named

How Some Pittsburgh Neighborhoods Got Named

Allegheny Center, East & West All of these neighborhoods on Pittsburgh’s North Side take their names from Allegheny City, the independent municipality that was annexed by the city of Pittsburgh in 1907. Allentown This southern neighborhood of the city was named for Joseph Allen, an Englishman who purchased the land there in 1827. It became part of Pittsburgh in 1872. Arlington, Arlington Heights No one

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CCAC Adapts to Changing Times

CCAC Adapts to Changing Times

“Characteristically, community colleges have had the adaptability and flexibility to respond to their regions’ needs,” said Dr. Quinton B. Bullock, President, Community College of Allegheny County, who has been at the helm of CCAC since 2014. “We have embraced a partnership with business and industry to identify and develop programs to train our students for the future workforce. I have charged our Vice President of

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What’s in a Name? – Cambria County

What's in a Name? - Cambria County

“Cambria” is the Latinized term for the what the people of ancient Wales called their country Cymru. Cambria County shares that name perhaps because, like Wales, it has abundant coal. There are many other towns and communities in the county with interesting names. Here is a sampling: Carrolltown This community was named in honor of the United States’ first Roman Catholic Bishop, John Carroll, who

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The History of Community College of Allegheny County

The History of Community College of Allegheny County

In 1963, Pennsylvania passed the Community College Act, enabling regions throughout the state to create institutes of higher education. It came in response to the increasing number of high school graduates who wanted to continue their education. CCAC Opens With Two Campuses As a result, Community College of Allegheny County opened in 1966 with two locations: Boyce Campus in Monroeville and Allegheny Campus on the

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