Henry Hornbostel: Pittsburgh’s Most Flamboyant Architect

Henry Hornbostel: Pittsburgh’s Most Flamboyant Architect

While some may argue that Frank Lloyd Wright is the architect most associated with Pittsburgh because of his design of the celebrated Fallingwater and others may cite Daniel Burnham because of the numerous buildings he designed for Pittsburgh, none would argue that Henry Hornbostel was the architect who not only created masterpieces in Pittsburgh but did it with unsurpassed style. Hornbostel was born in 1867

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Pittsburgh’s Soldiers & Sailors Hall Preserving Military History

Pittsburgh’s Soldiers & Sailors Hall Preserving Military History

In his farewell address to Congress on April 19, 1951, legendary soldier General Douglas MacArthur said that, “Old soldiers never die; they just fade away.” No disrespect to the general, but Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood was founded to ensure that our soldiers and sailors and their selfless service never fade from our memories. During the Reconstruction and healing of the

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Andy Warhol: A Pittsburgher at the Core

Andy Warhol: A Pittsburgher at the Core

Andy Warhol was an artist, a celebrity, a cultural icon, an eccentric, and, at heart, a Pittsburgher. While most people associate Warhol with the jet set and locations like New York City and Hollywood, most fail to realize how much of a Pittsburgher he was. Andy Warhola (he began to drop the “a” from his last name while in college) was born on August 6,

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Henry Clay Frick and His Mark on Pittsburgh

Henry Clay Frick and His Mark on Pittsburgh

The Frick Building, Frick Park, Frick Fine Arts Building, the Frick Environmental Center: industrialist Henry Clay Frick certainly left his mark on Pittsburgh, but some may consider that mark to be more of a black eye. Frick is probably the most controversial businessman ever to operate in Pittsburgh. Even he acknowledged his unscrupulous nature, when former partner and then enemy, Andrew Carnegie, on his deathbed,

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George Romero: The Man Who Made Zombies Cool

George Romero: The Man Who Made Zombies Cool

There were zombie movies before George Romero made the 1968 cult classic Night of the Living Dead, but none of them had the impact that this independent horror film had. A low-budget flick with a price tag of $114,000, Night of the Living Dead premiered to a less than stellar reception. Vince Canby, The New York Times movie reviewer, described his experience when seeing the

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Johnny Unitas: A Legend in Our Own Backyard

Johnny Unitas: A Legend in Our Own Backyard

Western Pennsylvania has set the standard for quarterback excellence. It has been distinguished as the “Cradle of Quarterbacks” for producing such names as Joe Namath, Joe Montana, Jim Kelly, and Dan Marino. The gunslinger who pioneered the movement, Johnny Unitas, led a storied career of sheer dominance with an arm that put the NFL on the map. We remember his greatness fifteen years following his passing.

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Legacy in Western Pennsylvania

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Legacy in Western Pennsylvania

Frank Lloyd Wright, America’s most renowned architect, was not born in Pittsburgh, but he certainly put his stamp on our area with three Wright-designed masterpieces. Wright was a man of great contrast: his architectural designs reflected order and harmony, while his personal life was marked by chaos and discord. Formative Years Wright was born in Richland Center, Wisconsin, on June 8, 1867, to William Wright,

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Is the Biltmore on Your Bucket List?

Is the Biltmore on Your Bucket List?

If you’ve never been to the Biltmore Estate, you should consider adding it to your bucket list. Located in Asheville, North Carolina, the Biltmore is the nation’s largest home. Grandson of industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt and heir to the family’s vast fortune, George Vanderbilt built the estate as his summer retreat in the late 19th Century. The French Renaissance chateau-styled house has 250 rooms,  including thirty-five

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St. Anthony Chapel

St. Anthony Chapel

“I once remarked while giving a tour, that we’ve had visitors from every continent except for Antarctica. Then I saw a hand shoot up in the crowd and a man said, ‘I’ve lived in Antarctica, so you’re going to have to change that,’” said Carole Brueckner, chairperson of St. Anthony Chapel. Located on Troy Hill overlooking the Allegheny River on Pittsburgh’s North Side, St. Anthony

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The Duquesne Incline: Pittsburgh’s Treasure

The Duquesne Incline: Pittsburgh's Treasure

The term “national treasure” is often bandied about when talking about monuments such as the Statue of Liberty, Mount Rushmore, or the Washington Monument. Certainly, there are special buildings and places that are undeniably Pittsburgh–the Block House, the Cathedral of Learning, or the Carnegie Museums. While many cities have historical sites, unique edifices, or memorable museums, Pittsburgh is one of the few cities in the world with

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