What’s in a Name? – Westmoreland County

What’s in a Name? - Westmoreland County

We live, work, worship, and play here, but do we know how some of the towns, boroughs, and municipalities around us acquired their names? Some are obvious, having derived from descriptions of geographical or features found in that area. But what about those other places? How did they get their names? Some were named after people. Who were they? And why did they merit having

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Robert Morris

Robert Morris

If George Washington had had his way, today, you may be seeing Morris on Broadway rather than the musical Hamilton. Robert Morris was known as the “Financier of the American Revolution” and was such a financial wizard that after the war, President George Washington offered him the position of Secretary of the Treasury in his cabinet. Morris declined the position and urged Washington to select Alexander Hamilton instead.

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What’s in a Name? – Allegheny County

What’s in a Name? – Allegheny County

We live, work, worship, and play here, but do we know how some of the towns, boroughs, and municipalities around us acquired their names? Some are obvious, having derived from descriptions of geographical or features found in that area. For instance, Oakland is reported to have gotten that name because of the numerous oak trees found there. The North Shore received that appellation because it

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William Pitt the Elder: Pittsburgh’s Well-Respected Namesake

William Pitt the Elder: Pittsburgh’s Well-Respected Namesake

Had King George III of Britain listened to William Pitt, those living in Pittsburgh today might be sipping tea and watching cricket instead of drinking Iron City beer and watching Steelers football. The city of Pittsburgh was named for the noted politician and statesman, William Pitt the Elder (not to be confused with his son, William Pitt the Younger) who often defended the rights of

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Pittsburgh Flu Epidemic of 1918

Pittsburgh Flu Epidemic of 1918

World War I was winding down when, in the spring of 1918, soldiers and citizens in Europe suddenly began to fall ill and die. The movement of troops around the globe enabled this “mystery illness” to sweep across Europe and Asia and eventually kill approximately 50 million people worldwide. The “Spanish Flu” became the worst influenza pandemic recorded at the time. The virus was so

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100th Year of The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village

100th Year of The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village

Pittsburgh is rich in history. From the ancient oaks that line the streets of its old steel mill towns to the Revolutionary War landmarks; there is much for Pittsburghers to take pride in. This past week, one of Pittsburgh’s smaller-scale historic attractions reopened for its 100th season at the Carnegie Science Center. The Carnegie Science Center’s Miniature Railroad & Village reopened on November 21st with

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Horne’s & Their Iconic Christmas Tree

Horne’s & Their Iconic Christmas Tree

Since 1953, the lighting of the Horne’s tree has signified the beginning of the holiday season in Pittsburgh. The 100-foot tall Christmas tree goes up on the corner of the old Joseph Horne’s Department store building at Penn Avenue and Stanwix Street. The tree that wraps around the corner of the seven-story building has more than 2,500 lights and more than 2,000 ornaments. It is

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Explore the Mummies of the World

Explore the Mummies of the World

When mummies are mentioned, images of Egypt or classic horror films with Boris Karloff tend to come to mind. It is true, Egypt had mummies, but what many don’t know is that South America had them 9,000 years before the Egyptians. The Carnegie Science Center’s Mummies of the World: The Exhibition expands the horizon on mummies and shows that mummification practices have spanned the globe

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Our Hall of Fame Quarterbacks

Our Hall of Fame Quarterbacks

Presently, there are 26 quarterbacks in the NFL Hall of Fame from the modern era. Of those, six of them hail from our own backyard–more than any other place in the country.  Here are their stories. Johnny Unitas: 1979 Johnny Unitas was born in Pittsburgh on May 7, 1933, to Leon and Helen. Ultimately raised by a single mother after the death of their father,

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Plots of Famous Pittsburghers

Plots of Famous Pittsburghers

Throughout our area’s history, people who have been born here or have come here and made an impact on the world—some for good, while others not so much. Here’s a look at some famous people associated with Pittsburgh and where they have been laid to rest. John Brashear Most people associate parks with fun, but Riverview Park on the city’s North Side is also a

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