Spirits in the Carnegie Library of Homestead

Spirits in the Carnegie Library of Homestead

A dark past remains alive at the Carnegie Library of Homestead. Reports of unexplained noises and ominous figures lead many to believe the building is inhabited by restless spirits. Could the building’s connection to the 1892 Homestead Strike be the cause? The Carnegie Library of Homestead was founded in 1896 to serve a community struggling in the aftermath of a bloody battle. The Homestead Strike in 1892 pitted the steelworkers’ union against

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Pittsburgh’s Belt System: “The Perfect Accessory”

For drivers accustomed to straight east-west and north-south roads laid out like grid work, the streets in and around Pittsburgh can pose confusing navigational problems.  Due to our many streams and rivers, mountainous terrain, and numerous valleys, most of our roads are circuitous, following the natural lay of the land.  In Pittsburgh, this means the road you are on could be more crooked than a

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Pittsburgh’s Retirement Communities

Pittsburgh's Retirement Communities

According to a December 2012 Forbes magazine article, Pittsburgh has the oldest population in America with 23.6 percent of the population over the age of 60, in comparison to the national average of 18.5 percent over 60. As such, Pittsburgh is poised to be an example for the nation as a pioneer in aging well. One of the areas of interest to seniors is where

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Pittsburgh: Bursting with Bridges

Pittsburgh: Bursting with Bridges

When a city is located on a river, you expect to find several bridges spanning the waterway.  When that city is Pittsburgh, however, you find not just several bridges, but a seemingly innumerable amount of them.  One estimate puts the area’s bridge tally at nearly 2,000.  Pittsburgh boasts more bridges than Venice, Italy! The area’s rugged terrain, with its deep valleys, creeks, and rivers, would

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Greeks in Pittsburgh: From a Small Country to a Large Presence

Greeks in Pittsburgh: From a Small Country to a Large Presence

Greece has made a huge impact on the world. The Greeks have made enormous contributions to architecture, philosophy, theater, politics and government, sports, mathematics, science, and medicine: literally all of Western Culture. Like the diminutive size of their homeland (it’s about the size of Alabama), the Greeks who came to Pittsburgh were few in number when compared to some of their other ethnic counterparts, such

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Arabs in Pittsburgh

Arabs in Pittsburgh

Many cities in the United States have communities of Arabs. Although not as large as the communities in places such as Detroit, Washington, D.C., or Los Angeles, Pittsburgh has a small, but thriving enclave of Arabs. The term Arab is a description of people located in Western Asia and North Africa. According to the Arab American National Museum, Arab Americans come from the 22 countries

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Indian Community at Home in Pittsburgh  

Indian Community at Home in Pittsburgh  

As everyone knows, Christopher Columbus sailed from Spain in 1492 in search of a passage to India.  Instead, he found the Americas.  More than 500 years later we have a slightly different scenario: many Indians are leaving the subcontinent and discovering Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh area in the past has experienced waves of immigration; many came to the region seeking a better future in America than

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Italian Heritage 

Italian Heritage 

It’s la Dolce Vita for Italians in Pittsburgh We all know Christopher Columbus came to the New World in 1492, but it took many generations after that before his fellow Italians would establish a large presence in North America. During colonial times, there were a few Italians living here, but it wasn’t until later in the nineteenth century that the first sizable influx of immigrants

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Pittsburgh: New Slovakia?

Pittsburgh: New Slovakia?

When immigrants came to the United States, it was common for them to name the places where they settled after their native land. That’s why we have places called New England, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, etc. Not only were regions and states named in such a manner, but there are also numerous towns, villages, and cities with names reflecting the areas from where

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